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Quotes by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

  • English poet
  • Born October 21, 1772
  • Died July 25, 1834

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (; 21 October 1772 – 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher and theologian who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He wrote the poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and "Kubla Khan", as well as the major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on William Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture.


A mother is a mother still, The holiest thing alive.


Our own heart, and not other men's opinions form our true honor.




All thoughts, all passions, all delights Whatever stirs this mortal frame All are but ministers of Love And feed His sacred flame.




Christianity is not a theory or speculation, but a life; not a philosophy of life, but a life and a living process.




All sympathy not consistent with acknowledged virtue is but disguised selfishness.




Nothing is so contagious as enthusiasm.


Sympathy constitutes friendship; but in love there is a sort of antipathy, or opposing passion. Each strives to be the other, and both together make up one whole.




The principle of the Gothic architecture is infinity made imaginable.




As I live and am a man, this is an unexaggerated tale - my dreams become the substances of my life.




To most men experience is like the stern lights of a ship, which illuminate only the track it has passed.




Not one man in a thousand has the strength of mind or the goodness of heart to be an atheist.




The genius of the Spanish people is exquisitely subtle, without being at all acute; hence there is so much humour and so little wit in their literature.




Talent, lying in the understanding, is often inherited; genius, being the action of reason or imagination, rarely or never.




A man's desire is for the woman, but the woman's desire is rarely other than for the desire of the man.




The man's desire is for the woman; but the woman's desire is rarely other than for the desire of the man.




The most happy marriage I can picture or imagine to myself would be the union of a deaf man to a blind woman.


General principles... are to the facts as the root and sap of a tree are to its leaves.




Love is flower like; Friendship is like a sheltering tree.


Until you understand a writer's ignorance, presume yourself ignorant of his understanding.




What is a epigram? A dwarfish whole. Its body brevity, and wit its soul.




He who begins by loving Christianity more than Truth, will proceed by loving his sect or church better than Christianity, and end in loving himself better than all.




Works of imagination should be written in very plain language; the more purely imaginative they are the more necessary it is to be plain.




The love of a mother is the veil of a softer light between the heart and the heavenly Father.




Language is the armory of the human mind, and at once contains the trophies of its past and the weapons of its future conquests.




Poetry has been to me its own exceeding great reward; it has given me the habit of wishing to discover the good and beautiful in all that meets and surrounds me.




I have often thought what a melancholy world this would be without children, and what an inhuman world without the aged.




A man's as old as he's feeling. A woman as old as she looks.




That willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith.




Exclusively of the abstract sciences, the largest and worthiest portion of our knowledge consists of aphorisms: and the greatest and best of men is but an aphorism.




Alas! they had been friends in youth; but whispering tongues can poison truth.



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