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Amy Cuddy

  • American psychologist

Amy Joy Casselberry Cuddy (born July 23, 1972) is an American social psychologist, author and speaker. She is widely known for her 2012 TED talk, where she presented her research on the phenomenon of "power posing", a theory later disproven by several researchers. She has served as a faculty member at Rutgers University, Kellogg School of Management and Harvard Business School. Cuddy's most cited academic work involves using the stereotype content model that she helped develop to better understand the way people think about stereotyped people and groups.


Trust is the conduit for influence; it's the medium through which ideas travel.




It's not uncommon for people to overvalue the importance of demonstrating their competence and power, often at the expense of demonstrating their warmth.




Being a comfortable public speaker, which involves easily being able to go off-script, strongly signals competence.




I sometimes work with a communications and media training firm called KNP Communications. It's nice to bring the research to the practitioners; I learn a lot watching how they put it into practice, and I know they like to be on top of what's happening on the research front.




Politicians are very experienced - maybe too experienced - at using body language to signal power and competence. But what these politicians are much more likely to struggle with, or just neglect to do altogether, is communicate warmth and trustworthiness.




A lot of politicians, not surprisingly, hire consultants to help them with their nonverbals, presence, generally how they come across.



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