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A. N. Wilson

  • English writer
  • Born October 27, 1950

Andrew Norman Wilson (born 27 October 1950) is an English writer and newspaper columnist known for his critical biographies, novels and works of popular history. He is an occasional columnist for the Daily Mail and a former columnist for the London Evening Standard. He has been an occasional contributor to The Times Literary Supplement, New Statesman, The Spectator and The Observer.


There is no doubt that, since 1977 and the launch of Apple II - the first computer it produced for the mass market - many things which used to be done on paper, or on the telephone, have been done easier and faster on a screen.




I might be deceiving myself but I do not think that I do have an inordinate fear of death.




Everyone writes in Tolstoy's shadow, whether one feels oneself to be Tolstoyan or not.




Brain power improves by brain use, just as our bodily strength grows with exercise. And there is no doubt that a large proportion of the female population, from school days to late middle age, now have very complicated lives indeed.




It seems astonishing to be paid for indulging in pure pleasure. For me to go to Coburg is rather as if a trainspotter was sent for a few weeks to Swindon or a chocoholic asked on holiday by Green and Black.




The latest research has revealed that women have a higher IQ than men.




I do not find it easy to articulate thoughts about religion. I remain the sort of person who turns off 'Thought for the Day' when it comes on the radio.




When I think about atheist friends, including my father, they seem to me like people who have no ear for music, or who have never been in love.




I had lost faith in biography.




The scribbler's life is never done.




I think I became a Catholic to annoy my father.




I think one of the very frightening things about the regime of the National Socialists is that it made people happy.




Personally, I think universities are finished. So much rubbish gets taught.




I'm boring. My beliefs are neither here nor there.




Iris Murdoch did influence my early novels very much, and influence is never entirely good.




I'm starting to realize that people are beginning to want to know about me. It's a jolly strange idea.




The United States is the ultimate land of optimistic promise, but it also gave birth to quintessentially pessimistic tragedy: 'Moby-Dick.'




I wanted passionately to be a priest.




I very much dislike the intolerance and moralism of many Christians, and feel more sympathy with Honest Doubters than with them.




Anti-Semitism is extremely common.




The really clever people now want to be lawyers or journalists.




I don't write books inadvertently.




People become dons because they are incapable of doing anything else in life.




I suppose if I'd got a brilliant first and done research I might still be a don today, but I hope not. People become dons because they are incapable of doing anything else in life.



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