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Alan Shearer

  • English athlete
  • Born August 13, 1970

Alan Shearer, CBE, DL (; born 13 August 1970) is an English retired footballer. He played as a striker in the top level of English league football for Southampton, Blackburn Rovers, Newcastle United and the England national team. He is Newcastle's and the Premier League's record goalscorer. He was named Football Writers' Association Player of the Year in 1994 and won the PFA Player of the Year award in 1995. In 1996, he was third in the FIFA World Player of the Year awards. In 2004 Shearer was named by Pelé in the FIFA 100 list of the world's greatest living players.Shearer scored 283 league goals in his career (all in the first tier of English football), including a record 260 in the Premier League (of which 58 were penalties) with a joint record 11 Premier League hat-tricks, and a total of 422 in all competitions including international at all levels.


Somewhere along the line you've got to do your apprenticeship. But I'd want half a chance of being successful at it.




It doesn't matter that I didn't win a trophy because I did it my way and I lived the dream.




When I was a young boy I wanted to play for Newcastle United, I wanted to wear the number nine shirt and I wanted to score goals at St James' Park. I've lived my dream and I realise how lucky I've been to have done that.




Football's not just about scoring goals - it's about winning.




Some players are criticised for having no loyalty. Well, I wanted to go back home and play for the club I supported. I don't think that's a crime.




One accusation you can't throw at me is that I've always done my best.




I've got a great life that I really enjoy. But there is something chewing at me inside: that adrenaline rush from football, I miss that.




Whenever I have any spare time I have a game of golf.




Regrets? None at all.




I have had interviews and got close to taking a managerial job. I would consider going back into football.




Sometimes going in for a hard tackle generates a louder cheer than a great pass.




The fans have what they want. They want entertainment, they want passion and they want commitment.




We go there with confidence, but we know there is a very fine line between success and failure in this game.




Basically, a manager is a father figure to 20 or 25 blokes. It's about trying to get the best out of them and creating team spirit.




At times they don't like you to kick them and they feel you're not allowed to kick them.




I always practise penalties, but what people don't understand is that you can never recreate that pressure situation that you're under.




I still get butterflies when England are playing.




There are not many times when I get nervous, but I do a little bit with penalties.




I don't know what I believe in. I try not to think about it. I don't want to think about it.




I miss walking out of the tunnel, the 90 minutes and the adrenalin rush that I'll never, ever replace.




I hope I never have to face that feeling of missing and sending my country or team out of a competition.




You can take 100 penalties in training, but when you go out on that pitch in front of all those people and the television cameras, it's completely different.




The managers are getting paid very well by their respective clubs to do a job for their clubs not the country they are working in.




I don't watch a lot of TV, to be honest. With three kids I have my hands full.




I didn't watch cartoons, I was too busy playing football.




Management interests me at some stage in my life, I have always said that. When that will be I really couldn't tell you.



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