1     



Alber Elbaz

  • Israeli designer
  • Born 1961

Alber Elbaz (Hebrew: אלבר אלבז‬, born 6 February 1961) is a Moroccan-Israeli fashion designer. After a number of other fashion houses, he was the creative director Lanvin in Paris from 2001 until October 2015.


I like dresses for night; I like after-party more than party. I like the mystery; I like the dream, like fantasy dresses. I think, also, that you make women dream.




To be a fashion critic is easy because you just say, 'I love it, I hate it,' but life is more than love and hate.




In high fashion, we're always accused of doing things that are not very relevant, not the real world. I know that it's important sometimes to do fantasy, but I felt like touching people and going back to different women and men, especially the idea of different ages and body shapes.




I do sport at the gym a few times a week, but I hate it. Work is my only remedy. I feel so twisted and horrible in the morning, but then I go to the office and I start feeling better. Work is my Tylenol. Extra-strength.




The nature of fashion is family.




For me, Lancome was more than just a brand. There was something very nostalgic about the name, about the whole story.




I am not interested in perfection, and neither are the women who wear my clothes.




I like having the freedom to dress as I desire.




'Commercial' is not the word that has to be said only by CEOs. It has to be something that is maybe the essence of design, because design has some sort of art in it and creation, but it's also some object that you have to use. There is also this pragmatic end to it.




Nothing is ever enough for me. I'm always thinking what is wrong, what needs to be fixed.




I adore women, and the one thing I want to do more than anything is to see a transformation of personality when someone puts on one of my dresses.




Almost every collection I do has 200 different references. I don't have two of the same coat, two of the same dress. I have it in one color, in one fabric. I've tried to adapt the culture of couture, and the know-how and the heritage, but I try to update it.




The worst thing that can happen is if you're stuck within a bubble and you think that is what life is all about. It's great to see other people and hear from people of different ages and opinions.




Fashion is not always about what's new, it's also about what's good. And I think if you need to see what's good, you have to be there.




How do you stand out as a fashion ad campaign? By using people off the street; it does generate buzz.




I think that if you want to pass emotion, you have to write a letter. Emotions do not pass in SMS or in e-mail.




For me, the sketching of dresses was about fantasy and dreams. In my little room at home, I felt that I was somewhere else. In Paris, for instance.




At Yves Saint Laurent, I felt like the son-in-law - like I was part of the family, but not quite. When I was fired, I felt like the widow.




I always wear a dinner jacket. I never have this definition of what goes for the morning or the evening or what works for the weekend.




I'm always looking for a story.




One woman told me that every time she wears Lanvin, men fall in love with her. Another told me she wore Lanvin to face her husband's lawyer because she felt protected. If I can make men fall in love with women and if I can protect women, I think I can die peacefully.




I barely finish one pre-collection before I must start on another. Sales start, but I am already elsewhere creatively. The men's show is being prepared, but we also need to think about accessories, perfumes and other items. In sum, I never stop.




I work on fittings, mostly. You know, I sketch less and less in my work. I sketch for the show sometimes, but then it becomes more conceptual. But when I don't sketch, it becomes more pragmatic.




Our logo for Lanvin is a mother and a daughter. I've always said, 'It's not a lion, and it's not a horse. It's a mother and a daughter.' I find the logo very emotional.




The designers, photographers and models I work with, they are really hard-working people who are devoting their lives to fashion. They're kind of like nuns of fashion.




Fashion doesn't look good only on models; it can look good on different people of different ages and different body shapes.




If I am in a beautiful place, but I don't like the people, I am miserable.




I am very much a people person.




Many, many times I find that whatever is looking good on the screen doesn't always look or feel good on the body. So who do we design for - do we design for the screen, or do we design for women?




Run away from laziness; work hard. Touch intuition and listen to the heart, not marketing directors. Dream.




When you come into a house like Saint Laurent, or Chanel, or Lanvin, and you go into a place that existed before you were born and will exist after you die, it takes some time to get in, to get to people, and to get the energy of the place.




I want to know where is that committee in Switzerland that sits to decide what is in and what is out. I don't listen to the formula makers. I think maybe I have a selective hearing disorder.




I don't think that you can write music if you don't know how to play an instrument. You have to know the basics, then you can go forward.




I hate the word 'cool.' It gives me a rash.




We are being accused that some models are anorexic. But we as fashion designers cannot be blamed, because you know, when I talk to women around the world, rich and poor and young and old and intellectual and not, what they want to be is skinny. You ask them, 'What is your dream?' It's to be skinny. That's all they want.




There is always a reason why, and I need to tell the stories.



1