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Marcus Tullius Cicero

  • Roman statesman
  • Born 106 BC
  • Died 43 BC

Marcus Tullius Cicero (; Classical Latin: [ˈmaːr.kʊs ˈtʊl.lɪ.ʊs ˈkɪ.kɛ.roː]; 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman statesman, orator, lawyer and philosopher, who served as consul in the year 63 BC. He came from a wealthy municipal family of the Roman equestrian order, and is considered one of Rome's greatest orators and prose stylists.His influence on the Latin language was so immense that the subsequent history of prose, not only in Latin but in European languages up to the 19th century, was said to be either a reaction against or a return to his style.


In doubtful cases the more liberal interpretation must always be preferred.




It is the peculiar quality of a fool to perceive the faults of others and to forget his own.




Laws should be interpreted in a liberal sense so that their intention may be preserved.




What is thine is mine, and all mine is thine.




Glory follows virtue as if it were its shadow.




The magistrates are the ministers for the laws, the judges their interpreters, the rest of us are servants of the law, that we all may be free.




No one was ever great without some portion of divine inspiration.

No one was ever great without some portion of divine inspiration.




A man of courage is also full of faith.




There are more men ennobled by study than by nature.




If you pursue good with labor, the labor passes away but the good remains; if you pursue evil with pleasure, the pleasure passes away and the evil remains.




Just as the soul fills the body, so God fills the world. Just as the soul bears the body, so God endures the world. Just as the soul sees but is not seen, so God sees but is not seen. Just as the soul feeds the body, so God gives food to the world.




Hatred is inveterate anger.




Nature abhors annihilation.




Advice in old age is foolish; for what can be more absurd than to increase our provisions for the road the nearer we approach to our journey's end.




An unjust peace is better than a just war.




In honorable dealing you should consider what you intended, not what you said or thought.




He does not seem to me to be a free man who does not sometimes do nothing.




When you have no basis for an argument, abuse the plaintiff.




Knowledge which is divorced from justice, may be called cunning rather than wisdom.




A friend is, as it were, a second self.




We are motivated by a keen desire for praise, and the better a man is the more he is inspired by glory. The very philosophers themselves, even in those books which they write in contempt of glory, inscribe their names.




Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.




No one has the right to be sorry for himself for a misfortune that strikes everyone.




What sweetness is left in life, if you take away friendship? Robbing life of friendship is like robbing the world of the sun. A true friend is more to be esteemed than kinsfolk.




In everything truth surpasses the imitation and copy.




True glory takes root, and even spreads; all false pretences, like flowers, fall to the ground; nor can any counterfeit last long.




The only excuse for war is that we may live in peace unharmed.




Friendship improves happiness and abates misery, by the doubling of our joy and the dividing of our grief.




As I approve of a youth that has something of the old man in him, so I am no less pleased with an old man that has something of the youth. He that follows this rule may be old in body, but can never be so in mind.




Death is not natural for a state as it is for a human being, for whom death is not only necessary, but frequently even desirable.




Nothing is so unbelievable that oratory cannot make it acceptable.




No sane man will dance.




The false is nothing but an imitation of the true.




One who sees the Supersoul accompanying the individual soul in all bodies and who understands that neither the soul nor the Supersoul is ever destroyed, actually sees.




The enemy is within the gates; it is with our own luxury, our own folly, our own criminality that we have to contend.




The wise are instructed by reason, average minds by experience, the stupid by necessity and the brute by instinct.



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