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Bobby Rahal

  • American athlete
  • Born January 10, 1953

Robert Woodward "Bobby" Rahal (born January 10, 1953) is an American former auto racing driver and team owner. As a driver he won three championships and 24 races in the CART open-wheel series, including the 1986 Indianapolis 500. He also won the 2004 Indianapolis 500 as a team owner for the winning driver, Buddy Rice. After retiring as a driver, Rahal held managerial positions with the Jaguar Formula 1 team and also was an interim president of the CART series. Rahal was also a sports car driver during the 1980s, and made one NASCAR start for the Wood Brothers.


In racing, I wanted to be a winner and to be a winner, you have to be willing to roll the dice.




I have never had problems sleeping the night before a race.




What's really hit me over the years is that you go to every race and see all the well-wishers, and you really feel like you are connected with people after all these years.




I'd rather try and fail than not try at all, as they say.




You don't have to worry about whether the car is set up right or not, you know it is, and it's down to you. Ultimately, that's what every driver wants.




I guess it is the sense of personal satisfaction that racing gives you that I am probably going to miss, because in racing you get that feedback very quickly.




We ran three cars last year. Unfortunately, as time went on, we did have to let a few people go, which we regretted, but just because of the situation.




At this stage of the game, I am not sure what the hell is going to happen.




Being injured is something that happens in this sport. Anybody who gets into it understands that.




Obviously it's critical that the three cars are able to contribute to the program. I think that certainly has given much of the reason as to why we did so well at Indy over the last several years.




There's a tremendous number of the Daytona Prototypes.




I don't want people to remember me going through the motions.




My son is racing his first 24-hour this year with Porsche.




The place where I had so much success as a driver would be where I had my first win as a team owner.




We tried to create advantages. We were never complacent.




In 1982 when I showed up, the average age of the drivers in the series was something like 40, 41. The crowds were small. There was not much prize money. The competition wasn't very tight.




I'd seen people overstay their welcome and I didn't want that to happen at all.




I am going to miss that time when you take that corner better than anybody else could have taken it on that lap or you do that great qualifying lap or you make that great pass or you bring a crippled car home.




Competitiveness has been a big thing for me.




Today, the competition is considerably more intense.




The fans know that I have been giving it my all and that we had the good judgment to when to say when.



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