1



Brenda Brathwaite

  • American businesswoman
  • Born October 12, 1966

Brenda Louise Romero (née Garno, born October 12, 1966), previously known as Brenda Brathwaite, is an American game designer and developer in the video game industry. She was born in Ogdensburg, New York and is a graduate of Clarkson University. Romero is best known for her work on the Wizardry series of role-playing video games and, more recently, the non-digital series The Mechanic is the Message. She has worked in game development since 1981 and has credits on 49 game titles. For Wizardry, Romero provided game design, level design, system design, writing and scripting.


I don't remember not playing games. I think my pre-industry experience is me building LEGO houses and wishing people would go through them.




I love games. I honestly can't imagine working with any other medium. I guess it would be akin to an artist who's doing commercial art and then goes into education, but it really frees you up to do all other kinds of creative stuff.




I am most certainly a feminist.




My gender has never been an issue or a limitation. I was fortunate enough to be surrounded by strong women growing up, and with them as my role models, I was never limited by the traditional roles women find themselves in.




At Sir-Tech I went through the ranks, almost like an apprenticeship. I was very fortunate. The industry was smaller then, and I was able to work alongside some amazing game designers.




I worked at Sir-Tech, and then when I got old enough to go to college, I went to college but continued to work at Sir-Tech to put myself through college.




I think a game hits a high point when it provokes reactions the designer doesn't expect.




As a note, I never once refer to 'Train' as a game in the rules, and I also never refer to the participants as players.




I think games are a good medium for approaching any subject, particularly difficult ones, because by their very nature, they are abstract, invite interaction and allow us to confront and question things... particularly rules that we may blindly follow.




From initial concept to final build, 'Train' was close to a year in development. Much of this was research and letting the dynamics of the project come to the surface.



1