1     



Arthur Schopenhauer

  • German philosopher
  • Born February 22, 1788
  • Died September 21, 1860

Arthur Schopenhauer ( SHOH-pən-how-ər; German: [ˈʔaɐ̯tʊɐ̯ ˈʃoːpm̩ˌhaʊ̯ɐ]; 22 February 1788 – 21 September 1860) was a German philosopher. He is best known for his 1818 work The World as Will and Representation (expanded in 1844), wherein he characterizes the phenomenal world as the product of a blind and insatiable metaphysical will. Proceeding from the transcendental idealism of Immanuel Kant, Schopenhauer developed an atheistic metaphysical and ethical system that has been described as an exemplary manifestation of philosophical pessimism, rejecting the contemporaneous post-Kantian philosophies of German idealism.


For an author to write as he speaks is just as reprehensible as the opposite fault, to speak as he writes; for this gives a pedantic effect to what he says, and at the same time makes him hardly intelligible.




Obstinacy is the result of the will forcing itself into the place of the intellect.




To buy books would be a good thing if we also could buy the time to read them.

To buy books would be a good thing if we also could buy the time to read them.




Nature shows that with the growth of intelligence comes increased capacity for pain, and it is only with the highest degree of intelligence that suffering reaches its supreme point.




Honor has not to be won; it must only not be lost.




Every possession and every happiness is but lent by chance for an uncertain time, and may therefore be demanded back the next hour.




Treat a work of art like a prince. Let it speak to you first.




Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see.




The first forty years of life give us the text; the next thirty supply the commentary on it.




Almost all of our sorrows spring out of our relations with other people.




We can come to look upon the deaths of our enemies with as much regret as we feel for those of our friends, namely, when we miss their existence as witnesses to our success.




In our monogamous part of the world, to marry means to halve one's rights and double one's duties.




The doctor sees all the weakness of mankind; the lawyer all the wickedness, the theologian all the stupidity.




Because people have no thoughts to deal in, they deal cards, and try and win one another's money. Idiots!




The discovery of truth is prevented more effectively, not by the false appearance things present and which mislead into error, not directly by weakness of the reasoning powers, but by preconceived opinion, by prejudice.




Honor means that a man is not exceptional; fame, that he is. Fame is something which must be won; honor, only something which must not be lost.




It is with trifles, and when he is off guard, that a man best reveals his character.




If we were not all so interested in ourselves, life would be so uninteresting that none of us would be able to endure it.




Buying books would be a good thing if one could also buy the time to read them in: but as a rule the purchase of books is mistaken for the appropriation of their contents.




Friends and acquaintances are the surest passport to fortune.




A man's face as a rule says more, and more interesting things, than his mouth, for it is a compendium of everything his mouth will ever say, in that it is the monogram of all this man's thoughts and aspirations.




With people of limited ability modesty is merely honesty. But with those who possess great talent it is hypocrisy.




To free a person from error is to give, and not to take away.




Every parting gives a foretaste of death, every reunion a hint of the resurrection.




It is only at the first encounter that a face makes its full impression on us.




The wise have always said the same things, and fools, who are the majority have always done just the opposite.




After your death you will be what you were before your birth.




Journalists are like dogs, when ever anything moves they begin to bark.




Boredom is just the reverse side of fascination: both depend on being outside rather than inside a situation, and one leads to the other.




Every person takes the limits of their own field of vision for the limits of the world.




Rascals are always sociable, more's the pity! and the chief sign that a man has any nobility in his character is the little pleasure he takes in others' company.




Hatred is an affair of the heart; contempt that of the head.




There is no doubt that life is given us, not to be enjoyed, but to be overcome; to be got over.




In the sphere of thought, absurdity and perversity remain the masters of the world, and their dominion is suspended only for brief periods.




Wealth is like sea-water; the more we drink, the thirstier we become; and the same is true of fame.




Politeness is to human nature what warmth is to wax.

Politeness is to human nature what warmth is to wax.



1