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Aesop

  • Greek author
  • Born 620 BC
  • Died 560 BC

Aesop ( EE-sop; Greek: Αἴσωπος, Aisōpos; c. 620 – 564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day. Many of the tales are characterized by animals and inanimate objects that speak, solve problems, and generally have human characteristics.


If you allow men to use you for your own purposes, they will use you for theirs.




Persuasion is often more effectual than force.




Put your shoulder to the wheel.




Beware lest you lose the substance by grasping at the shadow.




The gods help them that help themselves.




A doubtful friend is worse than a certain enemy. Let a man be one thing or the other, and we then know how to meet him.




Destroy the seed of evil, or it will grow up to your ruin.




Our insignificance is often the cause of our safety.




The injuries we do and those we suffer are seldom weighed in the same scales.




Injuries may be forgiven, but not forgotten.

Injuries may be forgiven, but not forgotten.




No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.




The unhappy derive comfort from the misfortunes of others.




It is easy to be brave from a safe distance.

It is easy to be brave from a safe distance.




United we stand, divided we fall.




After all is said and done, more is said than done.

After all is said and done, more is said than done.



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