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Alain Ducasse

  • French chef
  • Born September 13, 1956

Alain Ducasse (French: [alɛ̃ dykas]; born 13 September 1956) is a French-born Monégasque chef. He operates a number of restaurants including Alain Ducasse at The Dorchester which holds three stars (the top ranking) in the Michelin Guide.


If my cuisine were to be defined by just one taste, it would be that of subtle, aromatic, extra-virgin olive oil.




Believe me, I did not come to London to cook farmed fish. All my fish are wild.




In London, there is no need for 25 high-end gastronomic restaurants. That would be too much.




Chefs don't become chefs just to earn stars - that's not the goal.




I live in Paris, yet Monaco, where I spend a lot of time, holds a very special place in my heart.




I travel the world, and I can see in Toronto the cooking is very personal. These people cook with their hearts.




Everywhere in the world there are tensions - economic, political, religious. So we need chocolate.




I love any excuse to work with a mortar and pestle.




I have restaurants, bookshops... but it's not an empire, more... a puzzle. If it were an empire, all my restaurants would be the same.




The proportion of ingredients is important, but the final result is also a matter of how you put them together. Equilibrium is key.




The real evolution is to learn something new every day - it's very important for chefs to share what they have discovered.




There are so many impassioned winemakers. I think there are more impassioned winemakers than chefs.




If you don't treat an ingredient and its flavors with respect - if you drown it in oil, for instance - you'll spoil it.




I didn't want to become a chocolatier among others, buying ready-to-use couverture. I wanted to take the same approach I follow in my cuisine: putting the product first, revealing the authentic taste of the products.




My wife Gwenaelle prepares an 'energy shot' for me for breakfast. It's a mix of linseed, cereal, and raisins, with fresh fruit like kiwi. She also adds yogurt for added texture and some pollen and honey for an energy booster.




Everything that pushes up out of the earth I love. Everything under the earth, root vegetables, I love to cook.




You need a good gardener and a good fisherman. The cook is not required.




It's not easy to have success with restaurants in different cities, but I like the challenge.




When I started cooking the meal at home, after I had started cooking in restaurants, I usually would prepare bay scallops or lobster.




I don't like being disappointed by somebody I trust. Fortunately, it rarely happens.




You take the best ingredients - the best cocoa beans - and you process them in the best traditional way, and you have the best chocolate.




In France, I am the fifth artisan to produce his own chocolate, and the others have been doing it for a long time.




I'm anti-globalisation. There is nothing more enriching than to go out into the world and meet people different to you. We must fight the spread of a singular way of thinking and preserve cultural differences.




The world forgets about people who are not useful.




Given the number of restaurants I have, I could easily travel all the time - but I try not to.




I think the French and the Japanese are both obsessed by seasons, small producers, freshness.




It's striking and unique in London how you know to create this alchemy between the concept, the food, the music, the staff. From the beginning to the end, with all these different elements, it tells a full story that you know very well how to develop and cultivate.




I am overfed, so when I am at home, I stop eating.




I only get fat when I eat food cooked by other chefs. At home, my wife does all the cooking. She makes simple things like soups and salads. We both like steamed tofu.




Failure is enriching. It's also important to accept that you'll make mistakes - it's how you build your expertise. The trick is to learn a positive lesson from all of life's negative moments.




What they've found so far in the Amazon is 5 percent of what there is yet to discover to eat in the Amazon because it's completely unknown. I've eaten things I've never eaten before over there.




I prefer to be able to identify what I'm eating. I have to know.




I don't do the same food in Tokyo that I do in Vegas and vice versa. If I did that, two weeks later I would have no customers.




Food is one part of the experience. And it has to be somewhere between 50 to 60 percent of the dining experience. But the rest counts as well: The mood, the atmosphere, the music, the feeling, the design, the harmony between what you have on the plate and what surrounds the plate.




I don't think the rating system places too much pressure on chefs. I prefer to put the pressure on my chefs to perform to the top standards.




For me, going to markets is the best way to understand the soul of a place.



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