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Aristotle

  • Greek philosopher
  • Born 384 BC
  • Died 322 BC

Aristotle (; Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs, pronounced [aristotélɛːs]; 384–322 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidiki, in the north of Classical Greece. Along with Plato, he is considered the "Father of Western Philosophy". Aristotle provided a complex and harmonious synthesis of the various existing philosophies prior to him, including those of Socrates and Plato, and it was above all from his teachings that the West inherited its fundamental intellectual lexicon, as well as problems and methods of inquiry.


Courage is a mean with regard to fear and confidence.




Different men seek after happiness in different ways and by different means, and so make for themselves different modes of life and forms of government.

Different men seek after happiness in different ways and by different means, and so make for themselves different modes of life and forms of government.




Without friends no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods.




The ideal man bears the accidents of life with dignity and grace, making the best of circumstances.




The law is reason, free from passion.




I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who conquers his enemies; for the hardest victory is over self.




The eyes of some persons are large, others small, and others of a moderate size; the last-mentioned are the best. And some eyes are projecting, some deep-set, and some moderate, and those which are deep-set have the most acute vision in all animals; the middle position is a sign of the best disposition.




We are not angry with people we fear or respect, as long as we fear or respect them; you cannot be afraid of a person and also at the same time angry with him.




Probable impossibilities are to be preferred to improbable possibilities.




Wishing to be friends is quick work, but friendship is a slow ripening fruit.




The moral virtues, then, are produced in us neither by nature nor against nature. Nature, indeed, prepares in us the ground for their reception, but their complete formation is the product of habit.




Long-lived persons have one or two lines which extend through the whole hand; short-lived persons have two lines not extending through the whole hand.




Well begun is half done.




In constructing the plot and working it out with the proper diction, the poet should place the scene, as far as possible, before his eyes. In this way, seeing everything with the utmost vividness, as if he were a spectator of the action, he will discover what is in keeping with it, and be most unlikely to overlook inconsistencies.




Those who excel in virtue have the best right of all to rebel, but then they are of all men the least inclined to do so.




Some animals utter a loud cry. Some are silent, and others have a voice, which in some cases may be expressed by a word; in others, it cannot. There are also noisy animals and silent animals, musical and unmusical kinds, but they are mostly noisy about the breeding season.




Quality is not an act, it is a habit.




He who is to be a good ruler must have first been ruled.




Man is the only animal capable of reasoning, though many others possess the faculty of memory and instruction in common with him.




The most perfect political community is one in which the middle class is in control, and outnumbers both of the other classes.




Politicians also have no leisure, because they are always aiming at something beyond political life itself, power and glory, or happiness.




It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.




If liberty and equality, as is thought by some, are chiefly to be found in democracy, they will be best attained when all persons alike share in government to the utmost.




Dignity does not consist in possessing honors, but in deserving them.




Excellence, then, is a state concerned with choice, lying in a mean, relative to us, this being determined by reason and in the way in which the man of practical wisdom would determine it.




Thou wilt find rest from vain fancies if thou doest every act in life as though it were thy last.




The duty of rhetoric is to deal with such matters as we deliberate upon without arts or systems to guide us, in the hearing of persons who cannot take in at a glance a complicated argument or follow a long chain of reasoning.




Fear is pain arising from the anticipation of evil.




The least initial deviation from the truth is multiplied later a thousandfold.




He who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself, must be either a beast or a god.




The greatest virtues are those which are most useful to other persons.




Homer has taught all other poets the art of telling lies skillfully.




At his best, man is the noblest of all animals; separated from law and justice he is the worst.




In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.




For though we love both the truth and our friends, piety requires us to honor the truth first.




The aim of the wise is not to secure pleasure, but to avoid pain.



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