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Alan Sugar

  • English businessman
  • Born March 24, 1947

Alan Michael Sugar, Baron Sugar (born 24 March 1947) is a British business magnate, media personality, politician and political adviser. According to the Sunday Times Rich List, Sugar became a billionaire in 2015. In 2016 his fortune was estimated at £1.15bn, ranking him as the 95th richest person in the UK. In 2007, he sold his remaining interest in the consumer electronics company Amstrad, his largest business venture.Sugar was chairman of Tottenham Hotspur from 1991 to 2001. He appears in the BBC TV series The Apprentice, which has been broadcast annually since 2005.


Among some of the youngsters, I think reality TV has installed that culture into them and inspired a few of them into wanting to be 'TV celebrities.'




Well, it's not hard to be number one entertaining Jew. Some of them are quite bleeding bloody miserable, really.




Once you decide to work for yourself, you never go back to work for somebody else.




Money is all right but once you have it you learn it's not the be all and end all.




I have principles and I am not going to be forced to compromise them.




I am tired of hustling.




When I was a kid, a policeman was someone you looked up to and respected.




Why work when you can fill out a few forms and get paid for doing nothing?




I believe employment regulations for women, whereby the prospective employer is not able to inquire about the interviewee's status regarding children, childcare, or indeed their intention of becoming a parent, are counterproductive.




If you lock me in the room with a piano teacher for a year I might be able to knock out a rendition of 'Roll Out The Barrel,' but will I ever be a concert pianist? No.




Youngsters have got to stop thinking about becoming the next Zuckerberg. It's a trillion-to-one chance. What they need is mater and pater to say, 'Get a job, son.'




I've just got an exceptional memory, if I say so myself.




I have always been an honest trader. I come from a school of traders where there was honour in the deal. No contracts, just a handshake and that's it, done. That's the way I prefer to do business but it's not always possible these days, sadly.




My main regret about my years in football was keeping my mouth shut like a little mouse, not daring to speak out because I was told you left the managers to get on with the job and that the chairman must never interfere with the manager's decisions or the performance of his team.




I don't make enemies, it's just I'm not afraid to speak my mind, which can sometimes mean people don't like what I am saying.




The entrepreneurial instinct is in you. You can't learn it, you can't buy it, you can't put it in a bottle. It's just there and it comes out.




I don't like paying 50 per cent of tax.




It is torment to be segregated out because of some bit of clothing that you're wearing.




Not everybody needs to go to university; they can get out and start working straight away.




You've got to admire Sir Richard Branson. He is a completely different style of businessman to me, but you have got to admire what he has achieved.




I came from a socially deprived background when I was 15, 16 years old, but one thing I knew was one - you don't abuse a policeman, and two - you don't steal things.




I never experienced any feelings of closeness and caring from my parents.




My mother was a housewife. My father was a garment worker.




There is a lot of luck in football. Following England is like following Wycombe Wanders or Leyton Orient. You hope for the best and hope you are lucky.




I get angry when people bring derisory actions against me.




You can't stop people printing what they want to print.




In America, everybody thinks they're an entrepreneur. That's the problem. It's not a title that anybody should call oneself.




There's too much of a culture that exists out there, what I call an expectancy culture, of things being provided.



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