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Aidan Quinn

  • Irish actor
  • Born March 8, 1959

Aidan Quinn (born March 8, 1959) is an Irish-American actor, who made his film debut in Reckless (1984). He has starred in over 40 feature films, including Desperately Seeking Susan (1985), The Mission (1986), Stakeout (1987), Avalon (1990), Benny & Joon (1993), Legends of the Fall (1994), Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (film) (1994), Blink (1994), Michael Collins (1996), Practical Magic (1998), Song for a Raggy Boy (2003), and Unknown (2011). Quinn has received two Primetime Emmy Award nominations for his work in An Early Frost (1985) and Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (2007).


Life is hard for everyone. That's why there's such a nice reward at the end of it.




Really, most of us just focus on what's in front of us. We're too busy putting out the fires of everyday life.




I'm not a city kind of guy. I'm happiest when I'm tromping through the woods. That's why I don't live in Los Angeles. Being physically away from Hollywood probably loses me a few jobs, but the best ones seek me out.




I loved working with Meryl Streep twice and I've gotten to work with my friend Liam Neeson on several occasions.




You have to make them laugh and then make them listen.




Money is just something to be circulated.




I think there's a down-to-earthness with Midwesterners and with people from the Midlands - which is where my family is from - in Ireland.




I get to do interesting roles and make a living.




I would love, more than anything, to do an out-and-out farce with huge physical energy. Just because you're from the minimalist school, it doesn't mean you can't go big.




Some actors actually think about what they're going to talk about during the interview - they read up and meditate and plan quotes and get all inspired. It's very smart, but it's so planned. I never think to do that.




Genetics play a huge part in who we are. But we also have free will.




Celebrity, to me, is not a thing to seek.




There will come a day when the phone doesn't ring as much as it used to.




You should learn to be happy with what you have. Besides, the fact that I'm not a huge star has allowed me to pick and choose the roles I want to do, not the ones some person sitting in a studio office thinks I should do.




I like the level of fame that I have. You get nice tables in restaurants sometimes, but fame isn't something that I find comfortable.




There's certainly more work for me in TV these days.




My thing about looking good is that it should be the character. If I'm playing a character who's concerned about his body - an athlete, say - I'll get in shape. If I'm playing a character who doesn't or wouldn't, I don't. I almost never get in shape for a movie, even though I know it would be a good career move.




I can't control how people are going to react. I try not to worry about what I can't control.




I had to bring myself back down to being a normal person again.




I think my being such a nomad let me into acting. I was always having to create a new image whenever we moved.




I'd wear clogs, short pants and ladies' bracelets. I created this aura for myself.




I'd sneak out of the house to meet girls at 3:30 a.m.




I'm not particularly a career-oriented guy. I'm lucky. I can make really interesting films much of the time with interesting people yet be anonymous, have a private life. But, I'd like to have the choice of the better roles.




I mean, I've been stupid in the past, and I've learned from that.



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