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Louise Bogan

  • American poet
  • Born August 11, 1897
  • Died February 4, 1970

Louise Bogan (August 11, 1897 – February 4, 1970) was an American poet. She was appointed the fourth Poet Laureate to the Library of Congress in 1945, and was the first woman to hold this title. Throughout her life she wrote poetry, fiction, and criticism, and became the regular poetry reviewer for The New Yorker.Dictionary of Literary Biography contributor Brett C. Millier described her as "one of the finest lyric poets America has produced." He said, "the fact that she was a woman and that she defended formal, lyric poetry in an age of expansive experimentation made evaluation of her work, until quite recently, somewhat condescending."


No more pronouncements on lousy verse. No more hidden competition. No more struggling not to be a square.




Stupidity always accompanies evil. Or evil, stupidity.




Your work is carved out of agony as a statue is carved out of marble.

Your work is carved out of agony as a statue is carved out of marble.




The intellectual is a middle-class product; if he is not born into the class he must soon insert himself into it, in order to exist. He is the fine nervous flower of the bourgeoisie.




But childhood prolonged, cannot remain a fairyland. It becomes a hell.

But childhood prolonged, cannot remain a fairyland. It becomes a hell.




Because language is the carrier of ideas, it is easy to believe that it should be very little else than such a carrier.




Innocence of heart and violence of feeling are necessary in any kind of superior achievement: The arts cannot exist without them.



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