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Bob Newhart

  • American comedian
  • Born September 5, 1929

George Robert Newhart (born September 5, 1929) is an American stand-up comedian and actor, noted for his deadpan and slightly stammering delivery. Newhart came to prominence in 1960 when his album of comedic monologues, The Button-Down Mind of Bob Newhart, became a worldwide bestseller and reached number one on the Billboard pop album chart; it remains the 20th-best selling comedy album in history. The follow-up album, The Button-Down Mind Strikes Back!, was also a success, and the two albums held the Billboard number one and number two spots simultaneously.Newhart later went into acting, starring as Chicago psychologist Dr. Robert Hartley in The Bob Newhart Show during the 1970s and then as Vermont innkeeper Dick Loudon on the 1980s series Newhart.


Mark Twain gave us an insight into the life on the Mississippi at the turn of the century.




The schizophrenic has no sense of humor. His world is a constantly daunting, unfriendly place.




I've been a very lucky actor.




I worked in accounting for two and a half years, realized that wasn't what I wanted to do with the rest of my life, and decided I was just going to give comedy a try.




Don't live in the past. There's no point. You can't change anything. What a waste of time.




The acting is better when you know your material is being judged.




Richard Pryor introduced me to the world of the inner city, and the urban world, and did it hysterically. My favorite comedian, even though we work 180 degrees differently, but funny is funny is funny.




I think that what comes through in Chicago humor is the affection. Even though you're poking fun at someone or something, there's still an affection for it.




Humor's a weapon if you want to make it one.




I've been told to speed up my delivery when I perform. But if I lose the stammer, I'm just another slightly amusing accountant.




Laughter gives us distance. It allows us to step back from an event, deal with it and then move on.




This stammer got me a home in Beverly Hills, and I'm not about to screw with it now.




I was never a Certified Public Accountant... I just had a degree in accounting. The reason I was never a Certified Public Accountant was because it would require passing a test, which I would not have been able to do.




The first time I heard Richard Pryor, I knew he would be a major force in the world of comedy.




The only way to survive is to have a sense of humour.




I just don't think most people put myself and Robert Frost in the same category.




I know Chuck Lorre personally, and am familiar with his work going back to 'Roseanne' and 'Cybil.'




No matter what hyenas sound like, they are not actually laughing.




With the advent of cell phones, especially with the very small microphone that attach to the cell phone itself, it's getting harder and harder I find, to differentiate between schizophrenics and people talking on a cell phone.




People are meant to be certain places, and I think I'm meant to be on a sound stage doing situation comedy.




Dick Martin, if you put a gun to his forehead, he couldn't tell you a joke.




People with a sense of humor tend to be less egocentric and more realistic in their view of the world and more humble in moments of success and less defeated in times of travail.




When I started, I was doing all the good comedians I'd ever seen. Then I developed my own voice. My routines are my natural way of looking at the world.




If you look at Jack Benny, George Burns, or Don Rickles, they've all had long, successful marriages. So, I think there's something about laughter and the durability of a marriage.




Well, my career choice made a difference because I never would have met my wife, Jenny. I met her through comedian Buddy Hackett. He set us up on a blind date and then we got married.




I think you should be a child for as long as you can. I have been successful for 74 years being able to do that. Don't rush into adulthood, it isn't all that much fun.




'The Mary Tyler Moore Show' was the best television, the best cast, the best-written television show ever.




Sometimes you forget you're famous. You wonder, 'Why is that person staring at me?'




I've always said people say on a dramatic show, 'I was crying. It was so emotional when he went and grabbed that little girl from a burning building and handed her over to her mother.' In comedy, the best thing you can say is, 'I think it's funny.'




I didn't know I was cool, but I was very flattered that some of the younger comedy writers came up to talk to me at the Emmys. I found that gratifying.




I always stayed away from political commentary. First of all, I didn't feel entitled. What I may feel about a candidate, I'm a comedian. I mean, if people like my comedy, that doesn't mean they should vote for the person I like. That's why I always kind of stayed away from endorsements.




I don't know how doctors pick one specialty over another. Some you can understand. Pediatricians. Or gynecologists delivering babies, bringing a new life into the world, but how does someone want to be a proctologist? How can you fall in love with proctology?




I love portraying the totally indifferent person.




What you see on stage is pretty much the way I am... a dry sense of humor.




I was not influenced by Jack Benny, and people have remarked on my timing and Jack's timing, but I don't think you can teach timing. It's something you hear in your head.




I have an aversion to laugh tracks - the moment I hear a laugh track, I go to another channel.



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