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Carl Jung

  • Swiss psychologist
  • Born July 26, 1875
  • Died June 6, 1961

Carl Gustav Jung (; German: [jʊŋ]; 26 July 1875 – 6 June 1961) was a Swiss psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who founded analytical psychology. Jung's work was influential in the fields of psychiatry, anthropology, archaeology, literature, philosophy, and religious studies. Jung worked as a research scientist at the famous Burghölzli hospital, under Eugen Bleuler. During this time, he came to the attention of Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis. The two men conducted a lengthy correspondence and collaborated, for a while, on a joint vision of human psychology.


There is no such thing as a pure introvert or extrovert. Such a person would be in the lunatic asylum.




Neurosis is always a substitute for legitimate suffering.




A 'scream' is always just that - a noise and not music.




If there is anything that we wish to change in the child, we should first examine it and see whether it is not something that could better be changed in ourselves.




When an inner situation is not made conscious, it appears outside as fate.




The least of things with a meaning is worth more in life than the greatest of things without it.




Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes.




Knowledge rests not upon truth alone, but upon error also.




Who has fully realized that history is not contained in thick books but lives in our very blood?




Follow that will and that way which experience confirms to be your own.




The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong.

The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong.




Great talents are the most lovely and often the most dangerous fruits on the tree of humanity. They hang upon the most slender twigs that are easily snapped off.




Knowing your own darkness is the best method for dealing with the darknesses of other people.




Mistakes are, after all, the foundations of truth, and if a man does not know what a thing is, it is at least an increase in knowledge if he knows what it is not.




The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves.




We are born at a given moment, in a given place and, like vintage years of wine, we have the qualities of the year and of the season of which we are born. Astrology does not lay claim to anything more.




One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child.




We should not pretend to understand the world only by the intellect. The judgement of the intellect is only part of the truth.




The man who promises everything is sure to fulfil nothing, and everyone who promises too much is in danger of using evil means in order to carry out his promises, and is already on the road to perdition.




Man's task is to become conscious of the contents that press upward from the unconscious.




The Christ-symbol is of the greatest importance for psychology in so far as it is perhaps the most highly developed and differentiated symbol of the self, apart from the figure of the Buddha.




Man is not a machine that can be remodelled for quite other purposes as occasion demands, in the hope that it will go on functioning as regularly as before but in a quite different way. He carries his whole history with him; in his very structure is written the history of mankind.




The Christian missionary may preach the gospel to the poor naked heathen, but the spiritual heathen who populate Europe have as yet heard nothing of Christianity.




Show me a sane man and I will cure him for you.




Your vision will become clear only when you can look into your own heart. Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes.




It all depends on how we look at things, and not how they are in themselves.

It all depends on how we look at things, and not how they are in themselves.




Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves.

Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves.




The debt we owe to the play of imagination is incalculable.




Grounded in the natural philosophy of the Middle Ages, alchemy formed a bridge: on the one hand into the past, to Gnosticism, and on the other into the future, to the modern psychology of the unconscious.




The most intense conflicts, if overcome, leave behind a sense of security and calm that is not easily disturbed. It is just these intense conflicts and their conflagration which are needed to produce valuable and lasting results.




A human being would certainly not grow to be seventy or eighty years old if this longevity had no meaning for the species. The afternoon of human life must also have a significance of its own and cannot be merely a pitiful appendage to life's morning.




A psychoneurosis must be understood, ultimately, as the suffering of a soul which has not discovered its meaning.




Nobody, as long as he moves about among the chaotic currents of life, is without trouble.




There is no coming to consciousness without pain.




In all chaos there is a cosmos, in all disorder a secret order.




In the child, consciousness rises out of the depths of unconscious psychic life, at first like separate islands, which gradually unite to form a 'continent,' a continuous landmass of consciousness. Progressive mental development means, in effect, extension of consciousness.



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