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Quotes by Harold Pinter

  • English dramatist
  • Born October 10, 1930

Harold Pinter (; 10 October 1930 – 24 December 2008) was a Nobel Prize-winning British playwright, screenwriter, director and actor. One of the most influential modern British dramatists, his writing career spanned more than 50 years. His best-known plays include The Birthday Party (1957), The Homecoming (1964), and Betrayal (1978), each of which he adapted for the screen. His screenplay adaptations of others' works include The Servant (1963), The Go-Between (1971), The French Lieutenant's Woman (1981), The Trial (1993), and Sleuth (2007).


I mean, don't forget the earth's about five thousand million years old, at least. Who can afford to live in the past?




Most of the press is in league with government, or with the status quo.




One way of looking at speech is to say it is a constant stratagem to cover nakedness.




Apart from the known and the unknown, what else is there?




I was brought up in the War. I was an adolescent in the Second World War. And I did witness in London a great deal of the Blitz.




There are no hard distinctions between what is real and what is unreal, nor between what is true and what is false. A thing is not necessarily either true or false; it can be both true and false.




The Companion of Honour I regarded as an award from the country for 50 years of work - which I thought was okay.




This particular nurse said, Cancer cells are those which have forgotten how to die. I was so struck by this statement.




Occasionally it does hit me, the words on a page. And I still love doing that, as I have for the last 60 years.




I think it is the responsibility of a citizen of any country to say what he thinks.




I tend to think that cricket is the greatest thing that God ever created on earth - certainly greater than sex, although sex isn't too bad either.




It was difficult being a conscientious objector in the 1940's, but I felt I had to stick to my guns.




My second play, The Birthday Party, I wrote in 1958 - or 1957. It was totally destroyed by the critics of the day, who called it an absolute load of rubbish.




It's so easy for propaganda to work, and dissent to be mocked.


Iraq is just a symbol of the attitude of western democracies to the rest of the world.




Good writing excites me, and makes life worth living.




While The United States is the most powerful nation the world has ever seen, it is also the most detested nation that the world has ever known.




There is a movement to get an international criminal court in the world, voted for by hundreds of states-but with the noticeable absence of the United States of America.




If Milosevic is to be tried, he has to be tried by a proper court, an impartial, properly constituted court which has international respect.




There are some good rules and there are some lousy rules.




All that happens is that the destruction of human beings - unless they're Americans - is called collateral damage.




I found the offer of a knighthood something that I couldn't possibly accept. I found it to be somehow squalid, a knighthood. There's a relationship to government about knights.




The crimes of the U.S. throughout the world have been systematic, constant, clinical, remorseless, and fully documented but nobody talks about them.




I think that NATO is itself a war criminal.




The Room I wrote in 1957, and I was really gratified to find that it stood up. I didn't have to change a word.




The past is what you remember, imagine you remember, convince yourself you remember, or pretend you remember.




I also found being called Sir rather silly.




I never think of myself as wise. I think of myself as possessing a critical intelligence which I intend to allow to operate.




A short piece of work means as much to me as a long piece of work.




One is and is not in the centre of the maelstrom of it all.

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