1



Akhmad Kadyrov

  • Chechen statesman
  • Born May 5, 1909
  • Died May 9, 2004

Akhmad-Haji Abdulkhamidovich Kadyrov (Russian: Ахмат-Хаджи Абдулхамидович Кадыров; Chechen: Къадири lабдулхьамидан кlант Ахьмад-Хьажи / Q̇adiri Jabdulẋamidan khant Aẋmad-Ẋaƶi; 23 August 1951 – 9 May 2004), also spelled Akhmat, was the Chief Mufti of the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria in the 1990s during and after the First Chechen War. At the outbreak of the Second Chechen War he switched sides, offering his service to the Russian government, and later became the President of the Chechen Republic from 5 October 2003, acting as head of administration since July 2000.


We need a strong police force - the Interior Ministry of the Republic of Chechnya. We have to get rid of the traitors who have managed to penetrate into the law-enforcement department.




One has to work for years and decades, to conduct negotiations, to stand for positions and points of view, to jointly develop a civilized view on the administrative and state organization of Chechnya.




People took part in the referendum because they were tired of the war. They are afraid of talking about it out loud, but they have shown exactly where they stand: Yes, we want peace, and we want to be a part of Russia.




The attempted assassinations against me were not accidental.




I grew up in a very religious family. I could read the Qu'ran easily at the age of five.




I always said that Wahhabism is unacceptable for the Chechen nation.




There is a rule of Sharia: If the enemy wants to suppress you, you are supposed to put up a strong resistance.




One has to nurture a new generation, to raise children in the spirit of Islam.




I have to say that elections, even in the most peaceful region, always make the hardest time for regional state institutions, including security structures.




Military troops were withdrawn from Chechnya on Dec. 31, 1996.




The people have already determined Chechnya's status at the referendum - it is a unit of the Russian Federation. Its political status is not to be discussed any more.




Criminals were coming to Chechnya from all over the world - they did not have a place in their own countries. But they could live perfectly well in Chechnya.




That is why I came to conclusion that the election must take place, so that the republic can have a government. If I were to say that everything will change for the better immediately, that would not be true. The struggle will continue for a long time.




In 2001-2002, I told the president that the election was supposed to take place when the war was over, at a time when we could return to peaceful life. We agreed upon that. However, I can see now that the election cannot be delayed any longer.




In the police force, two, three, five traitors are detected who are really working for someone else. When we cleanse the police of them, the problem will be simplified a lot. Terrorists will have no one to contact - they will be left without informers.



1